Be Thankful for the Worst Moments of Your Career

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Thanksgiving is a fascinating holiday because it unites the American population — all too easily fragmented into racial, ethnic, religious, and socioeconomic tribes —  with a day of celebration characterized by overeating, football, parades, sitting in traffic, and shopping. God Bless America.

Memorable, perhaps not for the intended reasons

Memorable, perhaps not for the intended reasons

Thanksgiving also prompts us to reflect on the aspects of our lives for which we are grateful. If this habit of reflection and gratitude is not already part of your regular routine, the holiday is a convenient trigger to start. Since so many other pundits will focus on being thankful for the happy, fluffy stuff (like kittens, having a Twitter account that isn’t censored by the government, etc.) I decided to take a different angle and prompt you to reflect on the worst moments of your career; the moments that we so easily sweep under the rugs of our memories.

Why be thankful for the worst moments? Two main reasons:

  1. Without the worst moments of failure, our best moments of success wouldn’t shine. Few of us will experience the extreme “rags to riches” arc of Dhirubhai Ambani (founder of Reliance Industries, one of India’s largest firms) or the drought-erasing victory of the 2004 Red Sox, but every moment of success is more enjoyable in contrast to relative failure.
  2. Our mistakes offer meaningful lessons and accelerate our growth. One of Ray Dalio’s principles is “pain + reflection = progress.” It is easy to read about concepts in books and articles, but the most powerful case studies are the ones we live through.

We’ve all had “forgettable” moments in our careers: the presentation that ends with confused silence, the spreadsheet error that gets through to the Board recommendation, the budget models that go through countless revisions over many bleary eyed weekends (to name a few of mine). Here’s an approach to making the most of those tough experiences:

  • First take a few moments to feel, truly and vividly, the painful feelings of failure and disappointment. Afterwards, it’s much easier to move past the negative experience without lingering regret or embarrassment. Don’t despair: life goes on. You are not an inherently bad person because of a poor choice or error.
  • Then reflect on what faulty reasoning or gap in skills led to the mistakes. We can take on new challenges with confidence provided by new skills and perspective. Be thankful that this failure occurred as early in your career as it did – you will now benefit from the learning for the rest of your days.

Just like roses can’t exist without manure, and a delicious turkey dinner can’t exist without a sink full of stinking dishes, professional blunders are an inevitable part of any career. Be thankful for the learning opportunities they provide, and soak up the satisfaction of success even more fully when it arrives.

Image credit: Business Insider
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