TIL: the agenda is a suggestion

Today I Learned

Meetings are a request for scarce resources, made days (or weeks) before the event. In the time between the meeting request and the event, new information appears and relationships evolve.

What this means to me

Any discussion should include the most important topics that the attendees need to address at the time of the meeting, not only those proposed in the agenda when the meeting was scheduled. If we don’t, we are wasting scarce resources, denying ourselves the current truth, and ultimately weakening our relationships.

Putting this knowledge to work

After reviewing the proposed agenda for a scheduled meeting, raise what I believe to be the most important topics to the discuss with the other attendees, and allow the group to decide how to devote the remaining time. Follow up 1:1 afterwards as needed to discuss the most important topics.

Two quick examples

  • Arriving at a standing monthly meeting, we review the pre-defined agenda and standard “status deck.” There are critical resourcing issues that emerged since the last meeting that aren’t on the agenda but are impacting the team’s rate of progress, so I ask the team is we can spend 10 minutes during the current meeting discussing that issue or to find another time before the end of the day that’s more convenient .
  • When I get a vague or empty meeting request from a person I don’t work closely with, I decline the meeting request and politely request clarification on what they want to achieve with the discussion. Sometimes a quick phone call can help soften this reply as it’s somewhat unusual in corporate culture.

References

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TIL: the stress comes from guessing

Today I Learned

Anxiety and stress in our most important relationships arises from guessing what others want from us, and from guessing how we should “show up” for them.

What this means to me

During intense conversations at home or at work, when I am guessing what the other person needs from me I feel anxious and physically stressed. This causes the conversation (and therefore the relationship) to degrade in a few ways:

  1. I’m no longer listening fully to the other person because I’m distracted by thinking about my own feelings and needs.
  2. In a state of “arousal” (fight-or-flight) my listening and attention will get even worse.
  3. The other person, seeing me in a stress state, could react to that with their own stress response, amplifying the anxiety and stress of the conversation.

Putting this knowledge to work

Just ask the other person what they need, and to tell them what you need, so that we can show up for each other in the most helpful way and avoid the stress of guessing.

Two quick examples

  • When my spouse starts telling me about a difficult part of the day, I can say “that sounds tough…do you need strategy or sympathy from me right now?”
  • When I am talking with someone on my team about a challenge we need to solve, be explicit about my expectations: “I just need to talk through this scenario with someone – can you help poke some holes in my hypothesis? If there are any actions for you afterwards, I’ll be specific.”

References

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TIL: Hack the half-second

Today I Learned

The human brain takes up to half a second after receiving sensory inputs to apply judgments, cognitive biases, and labels.

What this means to me

A core personal development theme for me is to become less reactive. Instead of classifying an event as bad (or good) and labeling the person who “caused” it as incompetent (or amazing), I’m trying to delay those sub-second reactions.

Putting this knowledge to work

Daily practice to delay my reaction between an observation and a response (meditation helps here). Change my genuine reaction to an event with curiosity: see things as neither good nor bad, just things to explore and understand. Don’t react at all to things that are out of my control (yes, this has echoes of Stoicism).

References

If you have questions or feedback about this idea, or about my new short-form post type “TIL,” please leave a comment below.