Delegate everything

All of the time management books, blogs, lectures, and videos you’ve already seen boil down to two concepts:

  1. Prioritization: Is the right work getting the right amount of resource overall?
  2. Delegation: Is the active work being done with the right leverage in the organization?

Since “the right work” is always a mix of urgent, strategic, cash-generating, compliance-driven, and internally-focused tasks, the list can seem nearly endless. For that reason it can be more useful to flip the question: rather than asking “what work should be done today?” instead think about prioritization as deciding what work should not be done by anyone in the organization.

By extending the same logic to a manager’s own work list, think about delegation as deciding what work should not be done by the most senior person on the team.

Recently I’ve attempted to take this principle to the extreme by challenging myself to delegate everything. Does this mean that each day I do…nothing? Of course not (although I still aspire to). It does mean that for each new task that passes the prioritization filter above, I ask the following questions:

  • Who on my team has already demonstrated the capability to complete this work successfully?
  • Who on my team could take this work as a development opportunity?

Then I will spend a few minutes with these folks and review the “what by when” to ensure that the deliverable, the ready date, the standard of quality, and the approach are clear.

Now in many cases the team member(s) are not yet ready to take on the new work, either because the capability gap is a bit too large, or other work must get done within the available time. Whenever possible, it’s best for the team member to attempt the work even if the manager completes it, both for the experience and to capture some specific feedback that supports his or her professional development.

Regardless of whether the team member completes the delegate-able work, both the manager and the team member benefit:

  • More frequent calibration on the team members’ capabilities and gaps to the next level
  • More frequent and more specific feedback
  • More visibility into the “day in the life” of the manager, which helps to increase transparency about the present (“what does she do all day?”) and the future (“do I really want that job one day?”)
  • More effort applied at the highest point of leverage in the organization – meaning that work is done by the most junior person who can complete it successfully. This creates capacity for both senior and junior resources to tackle more challenging work

Delegation is difficult because when done properly, there is a genuine risk of failure for both parties. By attempting to delegate everything, you are flipping the question from “what can I delegate?” to “what can’t I delegate, and why?”

For more information on delegation, time management, and organizational design, try these books by Eliot Jaques, Andy Grove, and Peter Drucker.

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