Delegate everything

All of the time management books, blogs, lectures, and videos you’ve already seen boil down to two concepts:

  1. Prioritization: Is the right work getting the right amount of resource overall?
  2. Delegation: Is the active work being done with the right leverage in the organization?

Since “the right work” is always a mix of urgent, strategic, cash-generating, compliance-driven, and internally-focused tasks, the list can seem nearly endless. For that reason it can be more useful to flip the question: rather than asking “what work should be done today?” instead think about prioritization as deciding what work should not be done by anyone in the organization.

By extending the same logic to a manager’s own work list, think about delegation as deciding what work should not be done by the most senior person on the team.

Recently I’ve attempted to take this principle to the extreme by challenging myself to delegate everything. Does this mean that each day I do…nothing? Of course not (although I still aspire to). It does mean that for each new task that passes the prioritization filter above, I ask the following questions:

  • Who on my team has already demonstrated the capability to complete this work successfully?
  • Who on my team could take this work as a development opportunity?

Then I will spend a few minutes with these folks and review the “what by when” to ensure that the deliverable, the ready date, the standard of quality, and the approach are clear.

Now in many cases the team member(s) are not yet ready to take on the new work, either because the capability gap is a bit too large, or other work must get done within the available time. Whenever possible, it’s best for the team member to attempt the work even if the manager completes it, both for the experience and to capture some specific feedback that supports his or her professional development.

Regardless of whether the team member completes the delegate-able work, both the manager and the team member benefit:

  • More frequent calibration on the team members’ capabilities and gaps to the next level
  • More frequent and more specific feedback
  • More visibility into the “day in the life” of the manager, which helps to increase transparency about the present (“what does she do all day?”) and the future (“do I really want that job one day?”)
  • More effort applied at the highest point of leverage in the organization – meaning that work is done by the most junior person who can complete it successfully. This creates capacity for both senior and junior resources to tackle more challenging work

Delegation is difficult because when done properly, there is a genuine risk of failure for both parties. By attempting to delegate everything, you are flipping the question from “what can I delegate?” to “what can’t I delegate, and why?”

For more information on delegation, time management, and organizational design, try these books by Eliot Jaques, Andy Grove, and Peter Drucker.

Advertisements

Which of these six leadership hacks are you using?

One day I will get around to creating a Hype Cycle (à la Gartner) for management and leadership buzzwords. Somewhere in between blockchain and tiger team you will find leadership hacking.

I don't always use jargon, but when I do it is crisp and disruptiveLeadership Hacks are Cliché but Effective

No, I’m not talking about the guy that learned all the languages while blowing hard boiled eggs out of their shells (no hyperlinks: if you don’t get that reference already, I’m not going to torture you with finding out). Leadership hacks are those subtle yet amazing techniques that aren’t written down in Drucker, or HBR, or Military Doctrine. These are the six techniques that I’ve observed in the real world over my first couple decades of professional experience:

  1. The Compelling Event: to prompt action (or a decision) by a certain date. Also known as “pencils down.” Why it works? In a multi-tasking, oversubscribed world, this technique prevents the modern version of Parkinson’s Law from taking hold: that every task expands to fill the time allotted.
  2. The Three Legged Race: to get two team members to confront their differences and appreciate their complementary strengths. Long-term version also called “two in a box.” Why it works? Often we fall into the trap of confirmation bias when we can keep people, or issues, at arm’s length. By forcing close collaboration, this can be overcome.
  3. The Yes, And …: Remove the word no from your vocabulary. Just like in improv comedy, to succeed you need to encourage participation and contributions, and work on redirecting creative energy towards the goal. You might be pleasantly surprised by new thinking that arises. Why it works? Gives your team the chance to provide the solutions (and receive the praise) while you constantly reframe and reframe.
  4. The Pre-Project Press Release: Begin with the end in mind. At the start of a project (or software development cycle), write the press release that you want to cross the wire when the project ends. Why it works? Visualization is a time-honored technique in athletics, performing arts, and business. Resist the urge to run off quickly to take action without planning the critical steps by working backwards from the goal.
  5. The On-site Off-site: Take a team into a conference room full-time for a full day (or week) to reach the depth of focus required for a true breakthrough in thinking. Oh, and also actually finish a task that they start. Why it works? Our work days have been fractured into thinner and thinner slices of focus by technology and projects running concurrently.
  6. The Weekly Digest: Send your manager, your team, or your customers a digest of important and interesting highlights from your work week. Include graphics and short summaries linked to longer items or attachments for easy digestion. The best Weekly Digests are a mixture of what matters to the reader with the topics that the author wants them to keep front-of-mind, written in a style that is lighthearted and enjoyable to read. Why it works? We can’t rely on others to communicate the ideas that are most important to our own success. In the hundreds (thousands?) of emails that people receive weekly, it’s easy to miss something important. Sending a digest email at the same time each week makes it a predictable, and in the best cases eagerly anticipated, summary. Take the time to advocate on your own behalf. Or, in a more Orwellian sense, ensure that you are the one to document history on your own terms.

Which of these have you used successfully? What would you add to this list? Leave a comment and let us all know!

The post Which of These Six Leadership Hacks are You Using? appeared originally on Leadertainment.com

If you can’t answer these three questions, you won’t increase revenue

In the words of Peter Drucker, patron saint of business leaders everywhere, “there is only one valid definition of business purpose: to create a customer.” Many professionals in private practice, such as designers, health care providers, architects, etc., rely on the quality of their work to sustain the growth of their business. At some point, repeat business and word-of-mouth referrals become insufficient to supply revenue required to grow (or sustain) a business. Larger companies often face the same challenge, but this post is directed more towards small businesses run by professional service providers.


Whether you have just set up your own professional service business, or are looking for more “tech savvy” ways to grow revenue, invest time in understanding the answers to the three questions below and you will see the payback very quickly.

  1. Who are my contacts, leads, and customers? Customer Relationship Management (CRM) has evolved several generations since the Rolodex. A web-based CRM database gives you secure, fast, permanent access to the contact details and history of interactions with everyone who’s paid you, and everyone who hasn’t – yet. Ideally, your CRM system will be integrated with marketing and content management tools (see below) to work more efficiently.
  2. Is my most engaging content reaching my most valuable customers? Brand reputation is maintained by the quality of the products and services their companies provide. But at any given moment, a very small percentage of the customers who are aware of a brand is actually purchasing from the company. The rest are either recent buyers (potential repeat customers at risk of buyer’s remorse) and future buyers looking to learn more about a company’s capabilities and form an emotional connection (because all commitments, financial and otherwise, are made with the head and the heart). To establish and maintain this connection, a firm first needs to generate great content, and then ensure it reaches key audiences through the channels they use most. This requires content management across multiple channels: web, email, blog, social media, and advertising. A structured approach can prevent spinning wheels and slipping down rabbit holes: here’s a very pragmatic checklist for creating a blog from Build.
    • Which tools? Squarespace and Jetstrap are powerful and intuitive website building tools, WordPress is a leading blog management site that can easily add more functionality, Verticalresponse makes managing email marketing with analytics very straightforward, and a presence on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook are table stakes for any business these days.
  3. Which lead channels are producing the most profitable sales? Don’t forget, you’re doing all this to make more money…so the last step is to check that all your contacts are reading all your content and actually buying more of your stuff. To do this, make sure the tools you choose provide the data–or even better, a button to click that gives you the answer–about which lead channels are producing the most profitable revenue streams. Should you increase your advertising budget, block out more time for in-person events, encourage more personal referrals, or nurture more repeat business?
    • Which tools? The CRM tools referenced in #1 above will all provide a sales funnel and lead analysis package. Of course this can be done with good old fashioned spreadsheets, too: feel free to contact me if you need help getting started.

Use these metrics to rev your Talent Engine: Intake stage

Now that we’ve defined the four stages of the talent cycle as Intake, Development, Delivery, and Transition, it’s time to define the key metrics that will help you manage the first phase. Without getting lost in the philosophical nuances between Drucker’s Management by Objectives and Deming’s systems view, let me try to instill some passion for metrics that spark change with two fortune cookie management quotes:

hiring-funnelSo what are the outcomes you are trying to achieve from the Intake phase of the talent cycle? Anomalies in these metrics will point you to the parts of the system that must change in order to achieve different results.

  • Time to fill open requisition
  • Percent vacancies (open positions divided by total positions)
  • Activity rate and yield for each step in the funnel (see diagram)
  • Yield by channel (i.e., sourcing, agency, referral, inbound application), job function, hiring manager
  • Percent of early exits (involuntary and voluntary terminations before 90 days of employment)
  • Satisfaction: hiring manager, candidate, new hire, recruiter
  • Percent of opt outs (i.e., number of candidates who withdraw at each step in the funnel divided by number of candidates who started that step)
  • Average candidate quality (based on assessments by hiring managers based on required qualifications for each role)

if your applicant tracking system doesn’t generate a dashboard of metrics similar to these, you may have to build your own. Start with a white board and upgrade to Excel or an easily configured database (like Quickbase) once you know what you want to measure, when, and how.

Next up: key metrics for the Development phase of the talent cycle.

What metrics have you used to measure talent intake? which of these are useless? Leave a comment!
image: http://www.sourcecon.com